Tom Lauck’s Deseloper.org

A Simple Modal – Redux

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Over a year ago I walked through an example of creating the basic foundation for a modal window using jQuery.  The goal was simplicity, minimalism, and flexibility to add-on functionality as needed.

As stated at the outset, this post was meant to illustrate a bare bones and simple example of a modal window. If you wanted to extend the functionality for example, it would be quite simple to [...] suit needs.

Last Year’s A Simple Modal Post

The example was well received in feedback from readers, and there was some constructive criticism as well. Equal to the amount of people that appreciated the minimalistic approach were requests from readers to support IE6, forms, and a host of other odds and ends.  Some readers had some useful feedback for features and additions that I purposefully did not include in an effort to keep things basic.

Therefore, I thought there was a nice opportunity to revisit the basic modal window script and make it a bit more comprehensive in an effort to suit the needs and requests of the aforementioned readers.  So before we get into the code, lets outline some things that have changed:

  • Converted for use as a jQuery plugin.
  • Added IE6 compatibility
  • Added Opera compatibility
  • Added ability to fade in and out
  • Added multiple ways of setting parameters
  • Added multiple content types (‘image’ and ‘iframe’)

View Example | Download Source

The Plugin

(function ($) {

	/**********************************
	* CUSTOMIZE THE DEFAULT SETTINGS
	* Ex:
	* var _settings = {
	* 	id: 'modal',
	* 	src: function(sender){
	*		return jQuery(sender).attr('href');
	*	},
	* 	width: 800,
	* 	height: 600
	* }
	**********************************/
	var _settings = {
		width: 800, // Use this value if not set in CSS or HTML
		height: 600, // Use this value if not set in CSS or HTML
		overlayOpacity: .85, // Use this value if not set in CSS or HTML
		id: 'modal',
		src: function (sender) {
			return jQuery(sender).attr('href');
		},
		fadeInSpeed: 0,
		fadeOutSpeed: 0
	}

	/**********************************
	* DO NOT CUSTOMIZE BELOW THIS LINE
	**********************************/
	$.modal = function (options) {
		return _modal(this, options);
	}
	$.modal.open = function () {
		_modal.open();
	}
	$.modal.close = function () {
		_modal.close();
	}
	$.fn.modal = function (options) {
		return _modal(this, options);
	}
	_modal = function (sender, params) {
		this.options = {
			parent: null,
			overlayOpacity: null,
			id: null,
			content: null,
			width: null,
			height: null,
			modalClassName: null,
			imageClassName: null,
			closeClassName: null,
			overlayClassName: null,
			src: null
		}
		this.options = $.extend({}, options, _defaults);
		this.options = $.extend({}, options, _settings);
		this.options = $.extend({}, options, params);
		this.close = function () {
			jQuery('.' + options.modalClassName + ', .' + options.overlayClassName).fadeOut(_settings.fadeOutSpeed, function () { jQuery(this).unbind().remove(); });
		}
		this.open = function () {
			if (typeof options.src == 'function') {
				options.src = options.src(sender)
			} else {
				options.src = options.src || _defaults.src(sender);
			}

			var fileExt = /^.+\.((jpg)|(gif)|(jpeg)|(png)|(jpg))$/i;
			var contentHTML = '';
			if (fileExt.test(options.src)) {
				contentHTML = '<div class="' + options.imageClassName + '"><img src="' + options.src + '"/></div>';

			} else {
				contentHTML = '<iframe width="' + options.width + '" height="' + options.height + '" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowtransparency="true" src="' + options.src + '"></iframe>';
			}
			options.content = options.content || contentHTML;

			if (jQuery('.' + options.modalClassName).length && jQuery('.' + options.overlayClassName).length) {
				jQuery('.' + options.modalClassName).html(options.content);
			} else {
				$overlay = jQuery((_isIE6()) ? '<iframe src="BLOCKED SCRIPT\'<html></html>\';" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" class="' + options.overlayClassName + '"></iframe><div class="' + options.overlayClassName + '"></div>' : '<div class="' + options.overlayClassName + '"></div>');
				$overlay.hide().appendTo(options.parent);

				$modal = jQuery('<div id="' + options.id + '" class="' + options.modalClassName + '" style="width:' + options.width + 'px; height:' + options.height + 'px; margin-top:-' + (options.height / 2) + 'px; margin-left:-' + (options.width / 2) + 'px;">' + options.content + '</div>');
				$modal.hide().appendTo(options.parent);

				$close = jQuery('<a class="' + options.closeClassName + '"></a>');
				$close.appendTo($modal);

				var overlayOpacity = _getOpacity($overlay.not('iframe')) || options.overlayOpacity;
				$overlay.fadeTo(0, 0).show().not('iframe').fadeTo(_settings.fadeInSpeed, overlayOpacity);
				$modal.fadeIn(_settings.fadeInSpeed);

				$close.click(function () { jQuery.modal().close(); });
				$overlay.click(function () { jQuery.modal().close(); });
			}
		}
		return this;
	}
	_isIE6 = function () {
		if (document.all && document.getElementById) {
			if (document.compatMode && !window.XMLHttpRequest) {
				return true;
			}
		}
		return false;
	}
	_getOpacity = function (sender) {
		$sender = jQuery(sender);
		opacity = $sender.css('opacity');
		filter = $sender.css('filter');

		if (filter.indexOf("opacity=") >= 0) {
			return parseFloat(filter.match(/opacity=([^)]*)/)[1]) / 100;
		}
		else if (opacity != '') {
			return opacity;
		}
		return '';
	}
	_defaults = {
		parent: 'body',
		overlayOpacity: 85,
		id: 'modal',
		content: null,
		width: 800,
		height: 600,
		modalClassName: 'modal-window',
		imageClassName: 'modal-image',
		closeClassName: 'close-window',
		overlayClassName: 'modal-overlay',
		src: function (sender) {
			return jQuery(sender).attr('href');
		}
	}
})(jQuery);

As you can see, quite a bit has changed – which is not necessarily a bad thing.  There is now tighter integration with jQuery and more out of the box configuration ability as a result.

Adding Some Style

.modal-overlay {
	position: fixed;
	top: 0;
	right: 0;
	bottom: 0;
	left: 0;
	height: 100%;
	width: 100%;
	margin: 0;
	padding: 0;
	background: #131313;
	opacity: .85;
	filter: alpha(opacity=85);
	z-index: 101;
}
.modal-window {
	position: fixed;
	top: 50%;
	left: 50%;
	margin: 0;
	padding: 0;
	z-index: 102;
	background: #fff;
	border: solid 8px #000;
	-moz-border-radius: 8px;
	-webkit-border-radius: 8px;
}
.close-window {
	position: absolute;
	width: 47px;
	height: 47px;
	right: -23px;
	top: -23px;
	background: transparent url(../images/close-button.png) no-repeat scroll right top;
	text-indent: -99999px;
	overflow: hidden;
	cursor: pointer;
}

Implementation

<a href="modal.html" onclick="$(this).modal({width:833, height:453}).open(); return false;">Modal iFrame</a>
<a href="images/your-image.jpg" onclick="$(this).modal({width:500, height:375}).open(); return false;">Modal Image</a>

Although a little more weight has been added to the script itself, the implementation is more flexible and can be used with just about any jQuery chain – whether its onclick, a document being loaded, you name it.  There is also an added ability to set parameters in your area of choosing – inside the CSS, in the plugin itself, or in the method call or jQuery chain object.

Moving Forward

So if you are looking for something extra simple, head on over to last years post and in the meantime enjoy the added functionality with this updated example.

View Example | Download Source

Oct 21 2009

A Simple Modal

author:

Updated – Version Available

A Simple Modal – Redux

[See a demo here]

Modal windows seem to be the rage these days and somewhat synonymous with “Web 2.0.” And yes, options exist, whether it be Lightbox, Thickbox, or .NET AJAX — to name a few. Recently, Facebox has emerged as a very promising contender. The aforementioned plugins/widgets have proven their usefulness to many developers during their life course. In fact they one might even go so far as to deem “standard” to the plugin of choice.

Yet, what if a scenario arises where you do not need such full featured capability? After all, most of the plugins out there come with their own CSS along with the JavaScript. This is not to say that CSS wouldn’t be necessary if one were to create a homegrown solution. The fact remains that their is still integration work involved.

Therefore, my aim in this post is to illustrate a simple example of leveraging the jQuery framework to create a simple iFrame modal window. Of course a polished plugin will be more robust, however, robust is at times overkill. It is at that point where simplicity comes into play and thus the forthcoming example.

Defining the Basics

First we create an object in JavaScript to encapsulate some core methods and properties that we could potentially reuse.

var modalWindow = {
	parent:"body",
	windowId:null,
	content:null,
	width:null,
	height:null,
	close:function()
	{
		$(".modal-window").remove();
		$(".modal-overlay").remove();
	},
	open:function()
	{
		var modal = "";
		modal += "<div class=\"modal-overlay\"></div>";
		modal += "<div id=\"" + this.windowId + "\" class=\"modal-window\" style=\"width:" + this.width + "px; height:" + this.height + "px; margin-top:-" + (this.height / 2) + "px; margin-left:-" + (this.width / 2) + "px;\">";
		modal += this.content;
		modal += "</div>";	

		$(this.parent).append(modal);

		$(".modal-window").append("<a class=\"close-window\"></a>");
		$(".close-window").click(function(){modalWindow.close();});
		$(".modal-overlay").click(function(){modalWindow.close();});
	}
};

Notice that only three CSS classes need to be defined, “.modal-window”, “.modal-overlay”, and “.close-window”. Because of the fact that we are trying to keep things simple, I’ve decided not to check to null’s in required properties (windowId, content, width, height).

Basic Design

Next the three classes from above need to be defined. The “.modal-overlay” class is the layer that covers the current view and serves as a backdrop for the modal window. “.modal-window” is obviously the window itself. In this case, the modal-window class is very generic since we will rely on the styling in the transparent iFrame for design. Lastly, I chose to implement a close graphic which is displayed using the “.close-window” class. Again, this is very basic.

.modal-overlay
{
	position:fixed;
	top:0;
	right:0;
	bottom:0;
	left:0;
	height:100%;
	width:100%;
	margin:0;
	padding:0;
	background:#fff;
	opacity:.75;
	filter: alpha(opacity=75);
	-moz-opacity: 0.75;
	z-index:101;
}
.modal-window
{
	position:fixed;
	top:50%;
	left:50%;
	margin:0;
	padding:0;
	z-index:102;
}
.close-window
{
	position:absolute;
	width:32px;
	height:32px;
	right:8px;
	top:8px;
	background:transparent url('/examples/modal-simple/close-button.png') no-repeat scroll right top;
	text-indent:-99999px;
	overflow:hidden;
	cursor:pointer;
	opacity:.5;
	filter: alpha(opacity=50);
	-moz-opacity: 0.5;
}
.close-window:hover
{
	opacity:.99;
	filter: alpha(opacity=99);
	-moz-opacity: 0.99;
}

The Grand Opening

Now that we have set some basic styles and defined our core functionality, we can open a new modal window to display our iframe.

var openMyModal = function(source)
{
	modalWindow.windowId = "myModal";
	modalWindow.width = 480;
	modalWindow.height = 405;
	modalWindow.content = "<iframe width='480' height='405' frameborder='0' scrolling='no' allowtransparency='true' src='" + source + "'></iframe>";
	modalWindow.open();
};

Implement

<a href="/example/modal-simple/modal.html" target="_blank" onclick="openMyModal('/example/modal-simple/modal.html'); return false;">Click here to open</a>

Implementation is simple, just make a call to the method created earlier with the source of the modal window.

Beyond Simple ‘Modaling’

As stated at the outset, this post was meant to illustrate a bare bones and simple example of a modal window. If you wanted to extend the functionality for example, it would be quite simple to create more “openMyModal” methods to suit needs. So if Facebox or Thickbox are too much for your application, why not try the simple approach?

Updated – Version Available

A Simple Modal – Redux

Apr 25 2008

Pre-Caching Flex Applications Using YUI

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I thought a little scenario might assist in prefacing this post.Bob has built a cool Flex application and it now time to show it off to the world. Bob is a web guy, so like most web guys, he uses YSlow to see the performance on his pages. Flex application and YSlow in hand, Bob uploads his files to his web-server. He then realizes that he forgot to ask himself one very important thing, “how big is this Flex application anyway?” To Bob’s dismay, the final size is almost 2 mb! Bob has some options:

  1. Not caring – he has some decency.
  2. Revisit code – he has a deadline to meet.
  3. Play around with RSLs – now he’s getting on the right track.
  4. Pre-caching the application – getting warmer.
  5. Pre-caching the application and the Flex framework – tada.

Now back to me…Bob’s best options here are 3, 4, 5. And more specifically 3 and 5. If you aren’t familiar with RSLs (Runtime Shared Libraries) in Flex, I highly recommend them. By implementing RSLs, it becomes possible to cut down the initial file size of the application, only loading libraries when needed.But one still has to load the swf libraries, even if RSLs are utilized. In many scenarios users visit a specific page or URI before accessing or launching a Flex application. For instance, a search page followed by Flex search results. To take advantage of this, why not take employ AJAX? After all, its primary purpose is the asynchronous transmission of data, so AJAX seems like the perfect tool for the job.I chose YUI for this example, but you could use jQuery or something of the like.

//Caching methods using YUI
var flashCache = {
	handleSuccess:function(o)
	{
		this.processResult(o);
	},
	handleFailure:function(o){ },
	processResult:function(o){ },
	startRequest:function(url) {
		YAHOO.util.Connect.asyncRequest('GET', url, callback, null);
	}
};
var callback = {
	success:flashCache.handleSuccess,
	failure:flashCache.handleFailure,
	scope: flashCache
};

//Cache the swf and swz
window.onload = function()
{
	flashCache.startRequest("flexApplicaiton.swf");
	flashCache.startRequest("framework_3.0.189825.swf");
	flashCache.startRequest("framework_3.0.189825.swz");
};

By asynchronously loading the Flex application, Framework while the user is taking a preliminary action, you basically take the 2 mb Flex application (although hopefully it is less because you are using Runtime Shared Libraries) and turn it into 12-40k. Otherwise known as the size of the page which the swf file is embedded. (The photo below is not a real representation of the scenario, but illustrates the difference in cache.)

YUI Cache

It is understood that most users who visit your site have an empty cache. However, if you have instances where the user will spend some significant amount of time (enough to load the swf), you and Bob (from the outset) can rejoice in the now optimized speed and total score benchmark you will receive in YSlow…2 mb Flex application included.

Mar 19 2008